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Nasal Allergies

Allergies
Up to 40% of children in the United States have nasal allergies according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).These children likely have persistent sneezing along with a stuffy or runny nose. These symptoms, known as “allergic rhinitis” are more likely to develop if either one or both parents have allergies. Nasal allergies can be caused by outdoor allergens such as plant pollens (seasonal allergies) or indoor allergens such as mold, dust mites and pet dander.     If your child has seasonal allergies, pay attention to the pollen counts and try to keep them inside when the pollen levels are high. In the Spring and Summer, during the grass pollen season, pollen levels are highest in the evening. In late Summer,early Fall (ragweed pollen season), pollen levels are the highest in…
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Shellfish allergies

Allergies, Food Allergies
    Shellfish allergies are a much greater problem than fish allergies, because it is much more common and causes a greater severity of anaphylaxis than most other allergies. Shellfish allergies are rare in children, it generally develops during adulthood and is lifelong in virtually all sufferers. Those who are allergic to one shellfish are generally allergic to all.     The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says that crustacean shellfish are one of the eight (8) foods or food groups that make up 90% of all serious allergic reactions in the United States.     Over 75% of people are allergic to all types of crustacean shellfish if they are allergic to any. The rate of allergy to non-crustacean shellfish and other sea creatures appears lower, but there is still a risk that would need…
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The hidden allergens that could be causing your allergies

Allergens
When you get a sudden onslaught of teary eyes, hacking cough or sniffles, it is easy to think it is pollen or ragweed in the air, or even your friends pet, But what about health problems like insomnia, fatigue, headaches, weight gain or digestive problems. The cause for these problems can also be allergies.     There is this belief that allergies are genetic, but genetics can not explain the dramatic and explosive increase in allergies in the past few decades. According to Dr. Galland, a New York based integrative medicine expert, “If you go back 50 years, there were very few people with allergies and 100 years ago hardly anyone had allergies”. Why such an increase?      Based on years of patient care and research, Dr. Galland says environmental factors are to…
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Tips for Avoiding Food Allergies

Food Allergies
“Knowledge” is key to keeping yourself and others safe from food allergens. It is necessary to think about allergen avoidance at every meal and social gathering. Accidents can happen, but being educated and prepared goes a long way in maintaining safety. Constant vigilance is needed to consider the safety of foods at each meal and snack whether at home or in a restaurant. At home, you can start at the supermarket with reading ingredient labels. Except under unusual circumstances, the label should list all ingredients. Surprisingly enough, some products have hidden ingredients that are not fully disclosed. Ingredients can change, so vigilance is needed by reading the label each time to ensure that any new ingredients are not problematic. While reading the ingredient labels you may come across a “contains”…
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Does A Peanut Allergy mean an Allergy to Seeds also?

Does A Peanut Allergy mean an Allergy to Seeds also?

Allergies, Food Allergies
First, let's learn the confusing meaning of nuts, seeds and legumes. This is especially confusing for allergic patients (and parents) who are trying to decide what foods to avoid. For example, "legume" is used to describe peanut as well as peas, chickpeas, and soy, yet also includes wattles and the black bean tree of Queensland. "Tree nut" has a limited meaning such as; almonds, cashews, macadamia nuts and brazil nuts. When we think of seeds, we think of small seeds like sesame, sunflower, poppy and pumpkin seeds, when coconut is actually also a seed. Even though there is little similarity between peanut allergies and tree nuts or seed allergies, there is an increased risk of other food allergies in people allergic to peanuts. Some doctors recommend that people allergic to…
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Can my baby be allergic to my breastmilk?

Can my baby be allergic to my breastmilk?

Food Allergies
The simplified answer is, No, your baby cannot be allergic to your breastmilk. Instead, however, your baby can possibly be allergic or sensitive to a protein in mom's milk due to something in mom's diet. In the rare instances this occurs, the most common culprit is cow's milk (ice cream, cheese, smoothies, etc.) While this occasionally true, the chances are slim, because only between 2% and 8% of babies are actually allergic to the small trace amount of protein in mom's milk. For a baby who's ONLY on mom's milk,  the risk is only 0.5% for the proteins in cow's milk and 0.7% for proteins in soy. What you should know is that in some studies, the small amount of proteins in mom's milk is actually helping the baby be…
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Spring means allergy misery for some

Spring means allergy misery for some

Allergies
Spring usually is a welcomed time of year, but for some people with seasonal allergies it means sneezes, congestion, runny noses and other symptoms that make them feel miserable. About 50 million Americans suffer from some type of allergy, the most common of which presents itself this time of year when triggers such as tree and grass pollen and mold spores become airborne. This type of seasonal allergy is often called hay fever. Read more
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New Evidence for Vibration Allergies

Blog
Scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a genetic mutation that causes for a very rare type of allergy - an allergy to vibration. The team of scientists, who were specifically housed at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) published their findings in the New England Journal of Medicine on February 3rd. Allergy to vibration, known as vibratory urticaria, causes sufferers to break out in itchy hives or skin rashes on areas of the body that endure vibration. Though the allergy tends to lead to only mild symptoms, for those with this particular allergy, everyday activities, such as exercising, riding in motor vehicles, hand clapping, and using towels can pose serious inconveniences. For some, the allergy…
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