Wasp Venom Immunotherapy

Wasp Venom Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy
In 1962 a paper was published in the Journal of Immunology by Mary Loveless titled “Immunization in wasp-sting allergy through venom repositories and periodic stings”. Loveless reported that a patient with an extreme wasp sting allergy can be protected for months with a course of 6 sacsful of wasp venom over 2 and ½ hours.  This study used a treatment which consisted of emulsified venom with mineral oil to achieve a slow release effect. The goal was to improve efficacy and reduce side effects. This method was a modified version of earlier trials that included using the entire bug. The whole body extract in earlier versions was less effective than the method that only included the venom. There were 11 people in the study for the 1962 study and 8…
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The first case of Oral Immunotherapy?

The first case of Oral Immunotherapy?

Immunotherapy
In June 1906 Alfred T. Schofield met a boy that was 13 years old, he had a severe reaction to eggs. He started treatment for the boy in December giving him 1/10,000th of an egg daily with a little calcium lactate. In January he increased the dosage to 1/1,000th of an egg which was taken daily without any noticeable adverse effects. In February pills with cooked and raw eggs were taken alternately with a dosage of 1/500th of an egg and the calcium lactate was discontinued. In March the amount was steadily increased till 1/75th of an egg. By June it was raised to 1/33rd he also ate a whole egg for the first time in his life. For July the pills were dropped and the boy was given pudding…
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Development of Allergen Immunotherapy

Development of Allergen Immunotherapy

Immunotherapy
The Lancet reported about grass pollen injection immunotherapy for summer hay fever by Leonard Noon and John Freeman on June 11th 1911. After Noon’s death in 1913, Freeman continued the work expanding the practice of immunotherapy. In 1930 Freeman published the first rush immunotherapy protocol. What followed was well written and cited but the beginnings were at St. Mary’s with Almroth Wright and his laboratories which were full swing trying to develop immunization. Blackley had shown previously that grass pollen had been causation in hay fever about 40 years before. His sister Dorothy Noon was the one that collected grass pollen for him. Noon confirmed that hay fever was the result of grass pollen before proceeding. Shortly after Noon was diagnosed with Tuberculosis and chose bedrest, it was there that…
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