Nasal Allergies

Allergies
Up to 40% of children in the United States have nasal allergies according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).These children likely have persistent sneezing along with a stuffy or runny nose. These symptoms, known as “allergic rhinitis” are more likely to develop if either one or both parents have allergies. Nasal allergies can be caused by outdoor allergens such as plant pollens (seasonal allergies) or indoor allergens such as mold, dust mites and pet dander.     If your child has seasonal allergies, pay attention to the pollen counts and try to keep them inside when the pollen levels are high. In the Spring and Summer, during the grass pollen season, pollen levels are highest in the evening. In late Summer,early Fall (ragweed pollen season), pollen levels are the highest in…
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Shellfish allergies

Allergies, Food Allergies
    Shellfish allergies are a much greater problem than fish allergies, because it is much more common and causes a greater severity of anaphylaxis than most other allergies. Shellfish allergies are rare in children, it generally develops during adulthood and is lifelong in virtually all sufferers. Those who are allergic to one shellfish are generally allergic to all.     The Center for Disease Control (CDC) says that crustacean shellfish are one of the eight (8) foods or food groups that make up 90% of all serious allergic reactions in the United States.     Over 75% of people are allergic to all types of crustacean shellfish if they are allergic to any. The rate of allergy to non-crustacean shellfish and other sea creatures appears lower, but there is still a risk that would need…
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Does A Peanut Allergy mean an Allergy to Seeds also?

Does A Peanut Allergy mean an Allergy to Seeds also?

Allergies, Food Allergies
First, let's learn the confusing meaning of nuts, seeds and legumes. This is especially confusing for allergic patients (and parents) who are trying to decide what foods to avoid. For example, "legume" is used to describe peanut as well as peas, chickpeas, and soy, yet also includes wattles and the black bean tree of Queensland. "Tree nut" has a limited meaning such as; almonds, cashews, macadamia nuts and brazil nuts. When we think of seeds, we think of small seeds like sesame, sunflower, poppy and pumpkin seeds, when coconut is actually also a seed. Even though there is little similarity between peanut allergies and tree nuts or seed allergies, there is an increased risk of other food allergies in people allergic to peanuts. Some doctors recommend that people allergic to…
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Spring means allergy misery for some

Spring means allergy misery for some

Allergies
Spring usually is a welcomed time of year, but for some people with seasonal allergies it means sneezes, congestion, runny noses and other symptoms that make them feel miserable. About 50 million Americans suffer from some type of allergy, the most common of which presents itself this time of year when triggers such as tree and grass pollen and mold spores become airborne. This type of seasonal allergy is often called hay fever. Read more
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Allergies & Anxiety

Allergies & Anxiety

Allergies
Scientific research has shown that having allergies makes it more likely that people will suffer certain anxiety disorders, such as generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and panic attacks. According to a new study published in Pediatrics, children who suffer from allergies starting at a young age are at an increased risk for anxiety and depression. Specifically, seasonal allergies seem to be the culprit for this group of people with a higher likelihood for anxiety and depression, and the more allergies these people have, the higher their risk. For those allergic children who suffered anxiety or depression, the degree of anxiety or depression varied from very mild to disorders that required treatment. However, allergic rhinitis, which involves allergy symptoms that specifically affect the nose, was specifically linked to the highest scores of…
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Celiac disease

Celiac disease

Allergies
[caption id="attachment_385" align="alignright" width="300"] Gluten - Summit Shah[/caption] Celiac disease, also known as "Gluten Intolerance" is a disorder that affects at least 1 in 133 Americans by causing a reaction to "gliadin", a gluten protein found in wheat, barley, rye and sometimes oats. The inflammation and destruction of the inner lining of the small intestine in someone with Celiac disease is caused by an allergic reaction to the gluten in the diet. This chronic digestive disorder leads to the malabsorption of minerals and nutrients. The disease mostly affects people of European (especially Northern European) descent, but recent studies show that it also affects Hispanic, Black and Asian populations as well. Those affected suffer damage to the Villi (shortening and villous flattening) in the lamina propria and crypt regions of their…
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Sesame Allergies Increasing in the United States

Allergies
Though sesame allergies affect less than 1% of the United States’ population, somewhere between 300,000 and 500,000 people in the U.S. are allergic to sesame. According to allergists, many more people are afflicted in the U.S. today than a decade or two ago. The most common symptom associated with sesame allergy is hives, with hives, stomach problems, and respiratory problems also occurring quite frequently. The allergy appears to now be as serious and as frequent to other common allergies, like those to tree nuts. Tree nuts include walnuts, cashews, hazelnuts, almonds, pistachios, and Brazil nuts. Further, recent research has shown that those allergic to tree nuts are at a higher risk for also suffering from a sesame allergy than those who are not allergic to tree nuts. One study found…
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Allergic Reactions to Insect Stings

Allergies
Many people are allergic to insect stings, which can be associated with a number of insects including honeybees, sweatbees, bumblebees, paper wasps, white-faced hornets, yellow hornets, yellow jackets, harvester ants, fire ants, and jack jumper ants. Less often, allergies can also occur to proteins found in the saliva of other insects, including mosquitos, horseflies, and kissing bugs. Stinging insect allergy can occur in response to insect venom and has the potential to be fatal if it causes anaphylaxis and disrupts the breathing process. This type of reaction occurs in approximately 0.4-0.8% of children and 3% of adults, leading to about 40 annual deaths in the United States. However, when it does not cause anaphylaxis, stinging insect allergy is not and manifests in non-respiratory ways. There are three main ways that…
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The Role of Platelets in Allergic Reactions

Allergies
There are a number of cells of the immune system that are involved in allergic reactions. Relatively recently, platelets were added to the list of known immune cells that contribute to the body’s response to allergens and to underlie aspects of asthma. Platelets are the smallest cells that travel within the blood and are shaped like plates when they are inactive. One microliter of blood usually contains somewhere between 150,000 and 450,000 platelets. Platelets are traditionally viewed as functioning to stop blood flow, which they do by clumping together to form blood clots. Given this function, it is important that we have enough platelets so that we are not at risk for losing too much blood should we cut ourselves. However, too many platelets can cause cardiovascular issues. Given their…
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