New Evidence for Vibration Allergies

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Scientists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have discovered a genetic mutation that causes for a very rare type of allergy - an allergy to vibration. The team of scientists, who were specifically housed at the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) published their findings in the New England Journal of Medicine on February 3rd. Allergy to vibration, known as vibratory urticaria, causes sufferers to break out in itchy hives or skin rashes on areas of the body that endure vibration. Though the allergy tends to lead to only mild symptoms, for those with this particular allergy, everyday activities, such as exercising, riding in motor vehicles, hand clapping, and using towels can pose serious inconveniences. For some, the allergy…
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Dietary Vitamin D Can Reduce Allergy Development

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Vitamin D, also known as the sunshine vitamin, has long been linked to allergies. Studies have shown that children who live farther from the equator are more likely to develop allergies and suffer higher rates of hospital admissions due to allergic reactions.  From November through February, it is thought that people in the north (at a latitude above 35°) cannot synthesize vitamin D because they are not sufficiently exposed to sun. Children and adolescents with lower levels of vitamin D in their blood are more sensitive to allergens than those with higher vitamin D levels. In 2012, a study published in the Journal of Pediatrics demonstrated that infants with vitamin D deficiency are at higher risk for allergies and eczema than those with sufficient levels of the vitamin. Further, the…
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